Since our establishment in April 2016, we've been meeting with - and listening to - many people in our community. The information they've given us, as well as the many concepts, plans and ideas they have already been working on, has helped us shape our approach to the residential red zone.

The four cornerstones of our approach to the residential red zone are outlined below:

 

Cornerstone 

Regenerate Christchurch's vision and values 

Regenerate Christchurch is at the heart of leading our city from recovery to regeneration. We want Christchurch to be a vibrant city that has opportunities for people to grow, connect and thrive. Our contribution will be through Regeneration Plans and leadership that will transform Christchurch.

Our contribution will be through Regeneration Plans and leadership that will transform Christchurch. 

To support the achievement of our vision, we will:

  • Be result-focused
  • Lead the timely and effective delivery of regeneration outcomes through the use of statutory tools and the provision of information and advice
  • Where necessary, prioritise regeneration activities to ensure effort and resources are focused on initiatives that will achieve the best regeneration outcomes for the whole city
  • Take a long term perspective to ensure we make a positive and lasting contribution
  • Build strong, collaborative and constructive relationships
  • Embrace a partnership approach with the mana whenua of Ngāi Tahu hapu, Ngāi Tūāhuriri 
  • Ensure advice and decisions take account of different perspectives and priorities.

Watch Ivan Iafeta, Regenerate Christchurch's Chief Executive, introduce regeneration planning 

Developing a shared vision and goals for the residential red zones  

A fundamental part of the regeneration planning process is understanding and reflecting the views of the community and acknowledging and respecting the work they have already done.

Regeneration planning for residential red zone land must consider many different factors. These include iwi values, aspirations and history, the capability and suitability of the land for different purposes, infrastructure requirements (including flood management), integration with surrounding areas, economic viability – both now and in the future – and opportunities for a return on, and respect of, the investment made by the people of New Zealand into the land.  

We will work with the community and local leadership to develop a shared vision and goals for the residential red zone. This will enable us to create inspirational and deliverable regeneration plans that represent the desires of the community and take into account a diverse range of perspectives and views. 

 

Co-created engagement approach 

We are putting people and communities at the heart of everything we do. Working with community members from diverse backgrounds and our strategic partners we have developed engagement principles that will underpin our work.

Our engagement principles are:

  • Put people and communities at the centre of what we do 
  • Listen first, then act – start from where our communities are at 
  • Utilise local expertise, knowledge and networks to help create collective responsibility and build momentum 
  • Be brave, honest, resourceful, visible and respectful  
  • Encourage a culture of inclusion and participation by reflecting diversity and promoting equity and accessibility.

We continue to work with communities to co-create an engagement approach for regeneration planning in the residential red zone. This work will guide our approach to engagement and will be weaved through the statutory process for regeneration planning for residential red zone. We want to be visible about how we plan to do things and believe we will all benefit from a shared understanding of the land. An important first step towards a shared understanding of the land is making available, in a collated form, existing land information for areas in the residential red zone.

Watch Chris Mene, GM Partnerships and Engagement, asking 'How should we co-create our engagement approach?'

A draft version of the emerging collective model for regeneration in Christchurch

 Engagement model

Draft-emerging-collective-model.pdf (PDF 7.9MB)

 

Our statutory framework

One of Regenerate Christchurch’s key roles is to lead the regeneration of the residential red zone reflecting the shift to locally-led regeneration. The process for making decisions about residential red zone land in Christchurch is clearly set out in legislation, through the Greater Christchurch Regeneration Act 2016. Once developed, the co-created engagement approach for regeneration planning in the residential red zones will be weaved through the statutory process to ensure that opportunities are provided for the community to contribute to, help shape and provide feedback on Regeneration Plans.  

Statutory Regeneration Plan Process for Christchurch's residential red zones

 Statutory Planning Process

Watch a video about the statutory process Regeneration Christchurch will follow as a draft regeneration plan takes shape.

Step 1 - Outline

Regenerate Christchurch prepares a draft Outline for a Regeneration Plan. The draft Outline must identify the opportunities for public engagement on the development of the draft Plan and set out the process for developing the draft Plan.  Regenerate Christchurch must seek the views of Christchurch City Council, Environment Canterbury, Te Rūnanga o Ngāi Tahu, Ōtākaro Limited and the chief executive of the Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet.  Those views must be considered by Regenerate Christchurch when finalising the draft Outline.

Regenerate Christchurch must submit the draft Outline to Ōtākaro Limited for its consent before submitting it to the Minister supporting Greater Christchurch Regeneration. Ōtākaro Limited’s role is to represent the Crown’s property interests in the residential red zone. Ōtākaro Limited can only withhold its consent for reasons that are consistent with one or more purposes of the Greater Christchurch Regeneration Act 2016. Section 3 of the Act sets out the purposes of the Act.

Step 2 - "Ok" to proceed

Regenerate Christchurch submits the draft Outline to the Minister for approval.  The Minister must approve the draft Outline if he or she considers that approving the Outline meets one or more of the purposes of the Act and where he or she reasonably considers it to be necessary.  This means that the Minister can only refuse to approve an Outline on limited grounds. If the Minister approves the Outline, Regenerate Christchurch must publish a notice that summarises the Outline and specifies where the full Outline can be inspected.  If the Minister declines the draft Outline, the Minister must explain to Regenerate Christchurch why he or she has done so.

Step 3 - Develop draft Regeneration Plan

Regenerate Christchurch is responsible for developing the draft Plan.  The draft Plan must be developed in line with the approved Outline.  In developing the draft Plan, Regenerate Christchurch will engage with the community and must also seek the views of Christchurch City Council, Environment Canterbury, Te Rūnanga o Ngāi Tahu, Ōtākaro Limited and the chief executive of the Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet.  All comments and feedback must be considered and taken into account by Regenerate Christchurch when finalising the draft Plan.  The draft Plan must also be submitted to Ōtākaro Limited for its consent.  Ōtākaro Limited can only withhold its consent for reasons that are consistent with one or more purposes of the Greater Christchurch Regeneration Act 2016.

Watch Rob Kerr, GM Residential Red Zone, talking about how we get to the point of having a draft regeneration plan

Step 4 - Approval

In making a decision on whether or not to approve a draft Plan, the Minister must have particular regard to the views of Regenerate Christchurch.  The Minister must also consider any public comments and input on the draft Plan and the views of Christchurch City Council, Environment Canterbury, Te Rūnanga o Ngāi Tahu, Ōtākaro Limited, and the chief executive of the Department of Prime Minister and Cabinet.  The Minister must also consider the fiscal and financial implications of the Plan and whether the Plan is in the public interest.

The Minister cannot make changes to the draft Plan.  If the Minister declines the draft Plan, the Minister must explain to Regenerate Christchurch why he or she has done so.